Tag Archives: backpacking

On Wedding Planning in the Year of Love

22 Aug

I’ve learned a few things over the past 6 months. And not about outdoor gear or survival techniques or even healthy cooking and baking. About weddings.

Here’s what happens. You get engaged. You VERY briefly enjoy that amazing phase. The planning somehow sneakily begins…and does not end until (I am guessing) the moment you leave for the honeymoon.

Here we are, waist deep in wedding planning with a date just under 2 months out. And all we can think is, where has our hiking time gone? When will we fish? Where do we fit in a bike ride? It’s not that we don’t fit it in…on occasion. We DO want to look good for this wedding, after all.

We’re sane people. We have taken wedding planning as calmly and in as laid back a manner as possible. But, that said, I laughed when my friends who were married earlier this year said, “I don’t care how laid back you are, you WILL cry during this process” – and then they showed me. Cried twice, yelled once, was yelled at once and overall have felt so much more stress than I ever thought possible!

I know it’s all because I have high expectations of myself, of  creating an event that is true to our values, our style and our overall vibe – and I’m lucky in that very little of that expectation comes from sources outside of me and HT. Our parents are nothing but supportive (though they questioned our guest list at times) and have basically stated their hands-off support of our plans – offering hands when we decide to delegate. It’s generally worked out well…but it’s meant a lot of work.

We’ve deemed 2014 the “Year of Love”. We attended 4 weddings rapid-fire at the beginning of the summer, had to decline invites to two, and will attend at least one more before ours in October.

 

 

Let’s just say we’ve been taking notes…and the weddings that impressed us the most had a few things in common. We’ve decided to prioritize a few key areas in planning our own wedding, and people love lists  so let’s call it…

 

Our Top 5 Priorities in Planning Our Wedding:

 

1. Authenticity.

A ceremony that screams “I was selected from a list of 3 options presented by the officiant” tends to feel like an exercise in going through the motions. The weddings that struck us the most had music that felt personal, traditions that felt grounded in something real for that couple, and religious elements that truly seemed to resonate with the bride and groom. One thing we were reminded of over and over was the impact of writing your own vows. Rest assured, ours will be original. My mom’s wedding featured an interpretive dance and let me tell you, no one questioned the authenticity of that performance!

 

2. Feed the People. 

I swear I am going to start packing Bobo’s Oat Bars in my wedding clutch. Why is it that on more than one occasion, we ended up eating three slices of wedding cake out of pure hunger? Our takeaway…food need not be fancy if it A) tastes good and B) there’s plenty of it. Now don’t get me wrong – there are exceptions to my observations. One amazing Summer of Love wedding in BK featured spectacular farm-to-table, extremely intentional and gorgeous food. There, we did not leave hungry or less than impressed by any course, “fancy funfetti” cake included. A friend’s wedding in Canandaigua featured fried, salted spaghetti at the bar. Yum. There are a million ways to go with food, but HT and I agree, feed the people, and let them eat cake.

 

3. Speaking of Cake.

Wedding cakes can be gorgeous, but they’re not for us. Never a couple to skip a good treat (when it’s been earned with a hike, of course), we put flavor over fancy when it comes to desserts, so the traditional, hulking, towering cake, precariously transported and occasionally dry and tasteless, though impeccable, is not our pick for the special day. We’re working on desserts that taste great and make you drool to look at them… and there may be ginger snaps.

 

4. Forget Tradition for Tradition’s Sake. Not one of the weddings we attended this summer featured a bouquet toss, or a garter toss, or tossing of rice or birdseed or lavender or anything else Pinterest suggests. And guess what, everyone survived! We say, toss traditions and expectations that mean nothing to you, keep the ones that do.  Thus, we’ll have a father-daughter dance but we’ll skip the receiving line. We’ll cut the cake, but only so we can eat it! Every element that makes it to our wedding will be the product of thoughtful intention to include it by choice. Nothing is assumed, and we love that when our upstate NY, Carharrt wearing “wedding planner” says “now where would you like us to place the arbor” we can say, “what arbor, we don’t want an arbor, we have these gorgeous pine trees, and each other. That’s all the backdrop we need.” We’re doin’ it our way and it seems to be working.

 

5. Take Care of Your Guests, but Remember They Are (mostly) Grown Adults

HT and I keep falling into a trap where we realize that one  or the other of the two of us is getting stressed out and wrapped up in where our guests will be staying, who is staying with whom, how they ‘ll get there or when they’ll arrive. Then we take turns reminding each other that we can only give the people the info they need; we cannot force them to follow through, show up or confirm their reservations. At the end of the day, with the exception of the kids we’ve invited ( and we’re psyched there will be kids!) – these people are trusted adults who can manage themselves, and we have to trust them to do so – we have enough going on!

 

Don’t get me wrong. We’ve enjoyed much of the planning process and we’ve slashed and vetted so many elements of the “modern wedding” that didn’t feel right or necessary for us. But an intentional, authentic, personal wedding takes time and effort to create. We’ve said to each other many times, we love and anticipate our wedding, as it’s shaping up, but it’s a good thing we love each other even more. It will be a refreshing, welcome change to just be two married people, enjoying each other again when this is said and done.

 

Stay tuned and I just might share some photos…wedding porn, as my dear Colombian Cuz knows I like to call it.

 

XO

Blue Bin Signature

 

Bra Burning & 90s Gear: Backpacking Mt. Greylock, MA

21 Oct

HT and I agree hands-down, fall is the #1 season of the year. So, we took a little trip up to the Berkshires two weekends back to fit in a backpacking trip before the weather gets colder and our weekends get busier. Leaves, chilly nights and new toasty gear, fires, what’s not to love?

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We’d just picked up the AMC’s Best Backpacking New England book so we started there in deciding on a hike and we landed on the “Have a Grey Day” Mt. Greylock loop. I love how this book titles its hikes like the Abs Diet titles their recipes.

We also just got our hands on a new digital luggage scale (cool!) so we packed up our packs and weighed them for the first time. Yikes. Can you guess how much we carry for ONE NIGHT in the woods? Well first, I was super impressed with my base weight of 14.7lbs. But then, I added water and a few more toiletries. And I’m a BIG hydrator so I don’t skimp. Hello 24 lbs. Sheesh.  HT’s pack was heavier still…I’ll have to ask him to reweigh so I know for sure. To be fair, he carried the tent and a bit of my food…thus the uneven loads. And he’s a gentleman, of course.

So we headed into the woods with our usual gear and some grub left over from the Long Trail stock up (Mary Jane’s Farm Organics, Umpqua oats- now at Costco!) plus a box of those delicious Anna’s super-thin ginger snaps. We started up the mountain mid-day (later than we ‘d hoped) amidst beautiful changing leaves and rolling farm country hills. The trail from the bottom is the Hopper Trail, which meandered for a bit before it started to climb and climb. I was happy to hear HT huffing and puffing as much as I was on some stretches. I stopped him at one point to remind him that I’d been not only out of the hiking groove a little lately but also hadn’t carried a pack since early July. I just wanted to be clear that this hike was not a race. To me, at least.

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The trail was gorgeous. In that area, the leaves had clearly already peaked but enough remained on the trees to make for some spectacular forest views as the sun descended in the sky. There’s also just something so striking about orange and red leaves rimming a flowing creek. I love that kind of imagery.

IMG_0546 Continue reading

Mud, Sweat & Tears: The Long Trail 2013

12 Jul

It’s been a while!

There are many, many reasons why, but the biggest may be that we’ve been prepping for Hardtack’s Thru Hike of the Long Trail in Vermont’s beautiful Green Mountains. I’m happy(ish) to report, he’s deep in the mountains now!

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I’m also happy to report that I successfully completed the first 58 (or so) miles of the trail with him last week, July 2-6..so today’s hike profile will cover my stint as a Long Trail section hiker!

To begin at the beginning…

DAY 1

We started our journey with an early morning run to Stop & Shop to A) dump the change HT had been saving as his Trail Fund in the CoinStar machine; and B) grab some last minute fresh food (wax-coated extra sharp VT cheddar and apples).

Then we drove to Enfield, CT to drop the Duchess off at her country retreat (aka grandmother’s house) for the duration of HT’s hike. HT’s mom graciously drove us to the (rough around the edges) Springfield, MA bus station, where we caught a bus to Williamstown, MA, where the LT (sort of) begins.

We jumped off the bus somewhere near the middle of town and navigated to a coffee shop and hippie sandwich joint based on HT’s memories of the town from traveling through in his hockey coaching days. We packed a sandwich for our first night’s dinner, charged up our phones and walked….2+ miles…to the trailhead (talk about an annoying 2 miles).

Note: The trailhead was not the beginning of the Long Trail, as we were actually still in Massachusetts. We proceeded to hike the Cobble Hill Trail to take us to the Long Trail. We didn’t even BEGIN hiking until 5pm on Tuesday night. Hardcore, right?

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And of course, the SECOND we stepped foot into the woods, the skies opened up and the downpour didn’t stop until we reached the…

Seth Warner Shelter (the first on the LT, NOBO/northbound) where we pitched camp and attempted to dry off before scarfing down sandwiches and passing out.

DAY 2

Next morning, we picked slugs out of our soaking shoes, put our wet trail clothes back on and suited up for another day of anticipated rain. The rain held off but the mud more than made up for it. Continue reading

The backpacker’s porn loophole.

9 Feb

As Ruxin found the Sports Bra Bounce Test porn loophole on the League (he’s not allowed porn in the house by his wife, but thinks this an appropriate cheat), I have found the backpacker’s porn loophole. 

Have you met Cindy?

Holy guacamole. I’m a lady and I couldn’t tell ya now how to shower in the woods. Yeah, I got distracted.  The funniest part to me is this lady actually knows the outdoors. She might just be the real Backwoods Barbie. She and her husband Mike spend a lot of time outside and have a series of Hiking/Backpacking Tips videos (and lots of other crazy series) on their YouTube channel. I gotta say, How to Stay Clean is still the most, ahem, “informative”.

If your hiking partner suddenly subscribes to SoulSurvivorX2, just know they may be “learning” more than you think. But who can complain…sudden acquisition of outdoor skills helps us all on that dusty trail, whoever the teacher.

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The Long Trail: A Thru Hike For The Working Man

8 Feb
Time will tell if I go the shelter route.

Time will tell if I go the shelter route.

A few months ago I decided it was time to plan a hike on America’s oldest long distance hiking trail.  The Long Trail, inspiration for the creation of the Appalachian Trail, stretches over 270 miles through the Green Mountains from the Massachusetts-Vermont border to Canada.  Despite a high point of only 4,395 at the summit of Mt. Mansfield,  the Long Trail averages 500 vertical feet of gain or loss per mile for its entire length, nevermind that it is renowned for the presence of rain, mud and bugs.  By all accounts, it is a deceptively difficult trail, especially in the North.

Long enough to be a challenge, short enough to keep my job, the Long Trail seems like a good fit for now.

Since Christmas I have been doing my research.  Yes, I like to do a lot of research, especially when it comes to gear.    But, for this hike, I have to prepare for 270+ miles and gear is only part of my preparations.    As much as I hike now, the vast majority of my ventures are day hikes.  I’ve relied heavily upon Bob McGraw‘s “End to Enders Guide” and the Green Mountain Club‘s “Long Trail Guide” and official Vermont’s Long Trail Map in my planning.  All three are terrific and offer tremendous information and advice.

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Philip Werner’s www.sectionhiker.com (highly recommended), also offers an experienced perspective.  An example—he is a strong advocate of using the shelters provided on the trail to avoid wet nights and wet gear.  There was a time when I wanted to hike the AT, but all the accounts I read of mouse-ridden shelters have taken their toll.  I will be using a tent on this LT trek.  I’m guessing I can handle the extra 1-2 lbs. Mice or tenting in the rain?  Right now I prefer rain.  I’m sure Phil is right, but as I write from my warm, dry house, I plan 100% on using a tent each night.

As a precursor to the Long Trail, Blue Bin and I plan on tackling the infamous Devil’s Path in the Catskills.  If you are not familiar with the Devil’s Path, it is arguably the toughest hike in the East.  In a mere 24 miles, you endure over 14,000 feet of elevation gain and loss.  At the very least, after completing the Path I expect to be a bit more trail-ready and hopefully test my gear a bit.  As for Blue Bin, she plans to join me for the beginning of my Long Trail hike.  This of course, is assuming she is willing after a weekend on the Devil’s Path.  Stay tuned.

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